Clearing US immigration in Ireland.

Ive just done my first ever US Pre Clearance and it was a revelation! I have been aware of it for a while but only just got round to trying it out and I’m not sure I can ever go back now. Any none US travellers who have visited the United States must have experienced that fun 30-90 minute wait, filling in the white arrival cards and being sternly instructed to GET IN A LINE. Then undergoing 20 questions about where you’re going, who you’re staying with and for how long, whilst being jet-lagged, confused and forgetting the name of your accommodation, then missing your connection to Nashville? No, maybe it’s just me then.

There are actually 6 none US countries from which you can now go through all the immigration and customs checks, before you board your flight when you are still fresh faced and excited for the journey ahead. The particular airports are located in Aruba, The Bahamas, Bermuda, Abu Dhabi, UAE, Canada and where I boarded, Ireland. Sweden and the Dominican Republic are next to join the list I believe.img_2388

The main reason I believe these pre-clearance centres have been set up is to reduce the risk of terrorism and identify potential criminals before they even board the plane to the US. The other advantages for everyone else, is these airports potentially gets more traffic, it reduces the numbers and waiting times for everyone else at border controls in the US and makes it easier for travellers to leave their destination airport quickly and easily without delays on arrival. Basically a win win!

I travelled to Newark, New Jersey from Manchester, UK via Dublin this month (Nov 2017) with Aer Lingus and it was smooth sailing or should I saw flying, the whole way. I was then heading onward to Philadelphia, so it was refreshing to get straight off the plane and to the train station, potentially catch an earlier train than I would have if i’d had to queue in customs.

On arrival in Dublin there are loads of staff on hand to direct and advise all passengers who are travelling onward to the US, the Pre-Clearance area is easily signposted with a small US flag, making it hard to get lost. Before going through customs though, you end up in the main departure lounge, so unless you immediately need to head to your next flight, stick around here for a while. There are coffee shops, restaurants, bars, shops and a currency counter, although there are a few places to eat once you pass the pre-clearance area, they are limited. If you are vegetarian there are quite a few options, but the only place I found accommodating vegans was coffee express which had a falafel wrap, all coffee shops did seem to offer soy milk though.

I chatted to a member of staff who said at times the Pre-Clearance area can get busy, so don’t leave it too long to go through, but there were also announcements advising when passengers should clear the customs area for each US flight. When I heard an announcement for a different American flight, I left it 20 minutes and decided to take my chances and go through.

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First there is small x-ray security area to pass through with your bags, there was no queue! So I quickly moved on to stage 2, which was the customs machine. Here you answer the questions that are on the white arrival form, it is push button answers so it’s much easier, then you scan your own passport and fingers, again no queue. A clearance form was printed off and it was on to final stage 3, speaking to an official. Third time lucky, there was no queue again, and after a friendly chat, my passport was stamped and I was welcomed to ‘America’, the whole process maybe took a little over 5 minutes.

There is a separate departure lounge for all those who have passed clearance and are travelling on to the US, which like I mentioned has some facilities, a small bar, small restaurant, coffee kiosk, charging points, toilets and free but temperamental wifi, but its not as extensive as the main departure lounge, so just be aware. Once I landed in New Jersey, we exited as though we were on a domestic flight, straight out into arrivals, I had carry on luggage only, so headed straight to the Air-train onward to the main railway station.

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I would definitely consider travelling via Ireland (Dublin or Shannon) again, especially if I had a considerable amount of travelling to do once I had landed. It just means you can get a stress free head start on your onward journey and don’t need to factor in for an unknown wait at customs. In fact, I’m already looking at flights to Boston for next Autumn maybe . . . .

Philadelphia- City of Brotherly Love and Sisterly Affection

State No 6

I’m just back from a trip to Philadelphia, but as it was over 10 years since my last visit to this historic, vibrant East coast city, I was excited to return and explore more parts of the city I never managed too last time. I was there attending a workshop, but made sure I put aside time to visit some sights aswell.

Arrivals. You can fly direct from London, Manchester or Dublin, which takes around 8hrs. If you go via Dublin you get to experience Pre Clearance before you board the plane, which as I mentioned in my previous post is a revelation! I didn’t fly direct to Philadelphia this time, I went from Manchester (via Dublin) to Newark in New Jersey. There are lots of options to get yourself straight to downtown Philadelphia from other East Coast destinations, so don’t be put off if flights are super expensive direct to Philly as they were for me. If you fly straight into Philadelphia and are not hiring a car (if you plan to stay solely in and around the city you wont need one) then get the inexpensive, handy SEPTA, straight from the airport to downtown, the most central stations  to get off at will be 30th, Suburban or Jefferson.

If flying in from Newark your best two options are; get the Air Train to Newark Airport Train Station, then either board the Amtrak straight to 30th Street Philadelphia which is direct but can be expensive, or get the NJ Transit train to Trenton, then change to the SEPTA straight to downtown Philadelphia. If you fly into New York, you can get the train or Bus from Penn Station, while Washington DC also has direct buses (taking around 4 hours) and trains from its gorgeous Union Station direct to downtown Philadelphia.

Getting Around. A lot of sights are easy to walk too, especially if you group a few of them in the same neighbourhood together during your visit, the SEPTA (buses, trolleys and subway) runs all over the city and is super easy to use, while taxi’s, Uber and Lyft are also available everywhere.

History Bit. The city was founded by an English entrepreneur and Quaker called William Penn in the late 1800’s after he was gifted some land from King Charles II. Prior to this, the area of land that eventually became the capital of Pennsylvania was inhabited by the indigenous people of the Lenape. There is so much history here in this city, whether you want to learn more about slavery, the declaration of independence or even its religious past, it is all richly reflected here in a lot of the popular sights visited today.

What to see. Independence National Park and of course the star of the park, probably the most famous broken bell in the world, is the Liberty Bell. There is a lot to see in this area, all the sights are located close to 5th and Independence Mall which is a SEPTA stop handily enough. There is the huge Independence Visitor’s Centre which is the perfect place to start your historic day trip, open from 8.30 daily and free, there is a shop, cafe, theatre as well as exhibitions which illustrate and inform all visitors on the importance this city has had on the rest of the country. Across the street is the Liberty Bell centre, which is also free and open from 9am, its first come first served, so time your visit well to avoid the queues. If its busy and you can’t face waiting for a B’elfie (Bell Selfie?) then walk towards the Independence Hall past the Liberty Bell centre and take a look back and to your right, you can see the Bell through the glass wall. Visiting the Independence Hall is also free, but you need to book onto one of the tours in advance, there are also free gardens and outdoor exhibits all around this area making it a must do whether you have a passing or keen interest in the history of the USA.

One block north of the Independence visitor centre is the National Constitution Centre this is open daily, costing just under $15 per adult for a ticket. This includes access to the Signers Hall, lots of museum exhibits, an interactive We The People show and a theatre production which runs every 30 minutes depicting the history of the signing of the constitution, fascinating stuff!

This area is part of the oldest neighbourhood of Philadelphia, so just wander around and you will constantly find places of interest and historical significance, the oldest street is here Elfreth’s Alley in fact it is known as the oldest residential street in the US. Christ Church Burial Grounds is located close by, where you can take a fascinating leafy green walk through the churchyard where Benjamin Franklin was buried amongst other figures important to US history. This church ground is situated on Arch St and Independence Mall, and if you continue East down Arch, close by is the Betsy Ross House which is where the first US flag was made by Betsy herself, see there is history around every corner.

A short walk west along Arch St you pass the African American Museum, I couldn’t get to visit this time due to the workshop I was attending, but I definitely want to schedule in time to go next visit. Keep walking along this street and next up is the Chinatown Friendship Gate signally the start of Chinatown, like any Chinatown across the world there is a great colourful vibe, tonnes of shops, restaurants, cafes and a monthly Night Market. I headed away from Chinatown though this visit to Arch and 12th St and what may become my most favourite farmers market that I have ever visited, the loud, vibrant, assault on all the senses that is the Reading Terminal Market.
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Over 100 years old and open from 8am-6pm daily, you must plan a visit to explore the 80+ stalls of food, drink and crafts. Definitely give the place a once over before deciding where you sit and eat and what to buy, there are Amish stalls serving home made cheeses, butchers and fishmongers selling their fresh produce as well as places to buy kitchen supplies and flowers as well as the many restaurants. Stay for something to eat for sure, whether its a vegan corn dog at Fox and Son, a Philly Cheesesteak at Carmens or comfort food at the Dutch Eating Place you can easily spend an hour here, I even spotted peanut butter chocolate bacon for sale, but gave that a miss!

The architecture in Philadelphia is amazing, with a range of styles both old and new, from the art deco railway stations of Suburban and 30th St to the 60 storey Comcast Tower (due for completion in 2018) and its even higher neighbour One Liberty Place, it can make for a dizzying but fascinating wander. If you head West from Reading Terminal Market towards the skyscrapers of downtown, dominating the skyline is the Masonic Temple. Taking 5 years to construct and then another 15 years to finish the interior, you cannot fail to miss this beautiful elaborate granite building, taking up a whole block of its own. Tours are available but limited and cost $15.

Right opposite the Masonic Temple is the largest municiple building in the US City Hall, its another huge impressive building, that proudly stands in the heart of the city and makes a good point of reference when exploring this part of town. Although it never became the tallest building in the world as it had been hoped, it did hold the record for tallest building in Philadelphia up until the 80’s. If you have a head for heights ascend up the tower for what I can imagine are insane panoramic views of the city, tower tours finish at around 4pm though, so dont leave it late, I couldnt fit it in this time with it being a work trip, so have pencilled it in for next time.

IMG_2673 The great city hall peaking out at the end of Broad Street

The next big attraction on most peoples itineraries when visiting Philadelphia will probably be the Museum of Art and even if you arent an art lover and dont want to pay the $20 entrance fee, still head over so you can run up the famous Rocky Steps and get a photo by the statue. You can get there by bus or on the metro to 30th St station and from there its a 20 min walk along the Schuylkill River, but if you fancy walking from downtown, head down the gorgeous tree and flag lined Benjamin Franklin Parkway.

Even if you dont visit inside the art museum, head round to the back of the building and visit the sculpture and landscaped gardens with gorgeous views along the Schuylkill River, I only found them after a tip from my Lyft driver, who I gave 5 stars too of course!

There are so many more museums that are worthy of visiting, but as I was over for a work trip, I just couldnt squeeze as much in as I would have liked.  On my hit list for next time is the Franklin Institute, Rodin Museum, Please Touch Museum, The National Museum of American Jewish History and The Eastern State Penitentiary as well as the African American Museum that I mentioned earlier.

There is so much outdoor green space in Philadelphia, lots of parks, squares and river walks, which makes for a nice contrast when you have got your fill on museums and other indoor sights. Fairmont Park is the big one, with over 9,000 acres to explore, but there is also Franklin Sq, Love Park, Washington Square and the Schuylkill River Trail to name only a few.

Food and Drink – Philadelpahia does great coffee, with some unique independent coffee shops that also side hustle as clothing shops, creative spaces and music venues. Some gems I visited during my latest stay included Rival Bros and United by Blue and next time I really want to visit Grindcore Coffee which is a vegan coffeeshop.

Speaking of vegan food, I visited Hip City Veg twice during my stay, its a 100% plant based diner that serves the most delicious meat-free food including chick’n fajitas and tempeh burgers that even the most hardened carnivore would love and the green drink below is the insanely amazing kale lemonade.

 

Hot Tips –

  • A single fair on the Septa costs $2.50 or a 1 day convenience pass (max 8 rides) is $9
  • On the first Friday evening of each month there is a Art Walk in the Old City District.
  • Known as one of the best beer cities in America, there are more than 60 brewing companies in the Philadelphia region alone with many local companies organising brew pub tours.

Other sights

  • Six Flags Theme Park is only around 90 mins away on the train (change at Trenton)
  • Jump on the Septa to Wissahicken and hike the Valley Park Trail and then eat and drink along Main Street afterwards in the Manayunk district. Manayunk is Native American for ‘Where we go to drink’ by the way!
  • Shop, eat and drink along South Street in the heart of the city.

Always be polite – If you buy a $10 cheesesteak at Reading Terminal Market then a tip would be around $1.50.

My love affair with LA

State No 5

My favourite place on the globe is Los Angeles, my first ever visit was around 15 years ago, and I have just landed back from my 5th trip last month, so its now officially my most visited city outside of the UK. I know a lot of people who pass through, maybe having a day or two as part of a layover on the way to Hawaii or New Zealand and hate it, the noise, the traffic, the fact that actual downtown Hollywood isn’t glamourous at all, but I absolutely adore it and its much more complex and fascinating than just a few busy tourist streets with stars on the pavement and a sign up in the hills. 

There must be a million blogs out there featuring this the City of Angels, and with the actual county of Los Angeles covering 88 cities, there is no way that I could ever begin to cover in a single blog post a comprehensive list of what to see and do when visiting this part of Southern California. So I am just going to write up my favourite places to visit, with my must do list already growing, and my 6th visit already mapped out in my head. But with beaches, hills, museums and art galleries, flea and farmers markets, high end boutiques and dive bars and juice bars and nature trails and biking trails the list goes on and on, I cant believe anyone could not find something to love. 

History Bit.  Originally this part of California was inhabited by 4 coastal groups of Native Americans, the Tongva, the Tataviam, the Chumash and the Ajachemem, then in the late 1700’s the history books report that Mexican and Spanish missionaries arrived and started to set up the first community that is now close to Olvera Street in Downtown LA. Of course Los Angeles is much more than its most famous area, Hollywood, but it is a huge reason for its fame and the draw for people of all walks of life. The movie industry started to move here in the early 1900’s due to its great climate and close access to all kinds of perfect movie settings such as the desert, the hills, rivers, beaches as well as the urban areas and for me that is the big reason I keep returning, the diversity in both the people and the landscape. 

   
Arrivals. I have flown direct to the main airport LAX a couple of times and if you’re flying in from the UK, you have a number of airlines from both London and Manchester taking around 10 hours. If you don’t mind changing along the way, you will be able to fly from any other airport in the U.K. for example you could go Cardiff via Amsterdam or Liverpool via Dublin. I have also driven in from San Francisco along the famous coastal route 1, this can take around 8 hrs none stop, but the route is so beautiful, so we took a couple of days to enjoy it. Amtrak trains also travel in from across the country, finishing up at Union Station as do the greyhound buses, and I once travelled in from Yosemite, via train and bus. 

The public transport is still being developed in many parts of LA and due to heavy traffic, taking the bus can be a real adventure, but it is doable, the metro covers an extensive area of LA, but not to a lot of the tourist areas as yet. If you are on a budget, as I always am, an inexpensive way of getting to your accommodation on arrival from LAX is by Fly Away bus which costs $8 to Hollywood or you could order one of the shared shuttle buses such as Prime Time or Super Shuttle for around $15-20 depending on where you want to go. Driving is often said to be an essential when being in LA, but with taxis, Lyft’s and Uber’s it’s becoming easier to get around without having to hire a car if you’re only here for a short holiday, and not planning to go out of the city.

Sights. Hollywood is no doubt on most tourists hit lists when visiting for the first time, and it’s definitely a fun experience. The main sights are based around the famous Hollywood Boulevard and it’s here where you can find your favourite star on the walk of fame, visit the famous TCL Chinese Theatre where many film premiers take place, there is the Disney owned El Capitan Theatre across the street and the Dolby theatre where the Oscars are held. There are a whole bunch of museums situated here as well, including the Wax Museum, Madame Tussauds, the Hollywood Museum, Guinness Book of Records Museum and a Ripleys Believe it or Not. The Hollywood and Highland shopping mall is located, not surprisingly on the corner of Hollywood Blvd and N Highland Avenue, where you can shop, catch a movie and grab a bite to eat, and look out for a view of the Hollywood sign from up top. It’s also here on Hollywood Blvd where you can join one of the many stars homes tours and grab a photo with one of the  many characters dressed up as famous faces patrolling the pavements! 

  

Make sure you get yourself up to the Hollywood Hills too, which is actually part of the Santa Monica mountains, the views are iconic, and you can either grab a map and drive up yourself, one of the many tour buses will always include it as part of their itinerary, or you can take the Dash Observatory Bus (from Sunset and Vermont) up to Griffith Park. I’ve done all three over the years, how you decide to do it depends on your time and budget. You cannot drive straight up to the actual Hollywood Sign, but there are many vantage points for that perfect photo op, depending on how you are travelling up there, a tour bus will take you to a popular photo spot, but a quick internet search will throw up lots of self drive suggestions. 

 

Griffith Park is a great day out and perfect for when you want to get out into nature, pack a picnic and leave the traffic and city behind. The views are amazing looking down across the skyline and you are spoiled for choice for things to do, there are lots of hiking trails, a museum, a zoo,  mini railroad, caves, and of course the world famous Griffith Observatory. The observatory was closed for renovation during my first 3 trips to LA, but I finally visitied last month (Oct 2017) and it was worth the wait. The views up here for one are mesmerising, hazy downtown skyscrapers and dusty mountains, rare butterflies, birds and maybe even the odd coyote, but a visit to the observatory itself is full of a different discovery. Entry is free and you get 3 levels of space, and astronomy to explore, including the jaw droppingly exciting Tesla Coil which had multiple live demonstrations daily. The only time you need to pay is if you fancy watching one of the shows in the dome shaped planetarium, between $3-7 a ticket it’s well worth it, we experienced the Water is Life show and there are repeated showings throughout the day. As the observatory is open till late for night time viewings and monthly star parties, it doesn’t open until 12.00 daily, so we took a picnic and hiked one of the trails first before it got too hot, and then headed inside, it was a perfect day out.

 

Downtown LA This is the central business area of LA and the place responsible for that famous cluster of skyscrapers seen so often on TV and in films. It’s definitely rough around the edges, and there are certain areas I wouldn’t recommend walking around, but stick to the main streets and use taxis in the evening and you should be fine. There are some great reasons as to why it would be worth a visit to this part of town in the daytime though and some superb bars and restaurants too that would make for an unforgettable night out. My first ever visit to LA was to catch up with a Mexican friend, and he took me to Olvera Street  and the El Pueblo Historical Monument which is where the first Mexican settlers set up encampment, so it’s basically the birthplace of Los Angeles. Olvera street is an amazing tree lined Mexican Marketplace that hits all the senses, here you can buy all kinds of crafts, clothes and food, as well as the host of many festivals, you can take a free walking tour and visit some of the oldest buildings in the city. History, tacos and music, something for everyone! 

Union Station deserves a look in if you’re in the area, built in 1939 it’s the largest passenger terminal in Western US, a combination of Spanish Colonial and Art Deco the interior is outstanding. Even if you aren’t travelling on to somewhere else, it’s across from Olvera Street and has a couple of bars and a restaurant inside, so it could easily fit into someone’s downtown itinerary. 

  

Downtown is also where you can find Little Tokyo and Chinatown both fun neighbourhoods for great food, temples, museums and shops, I once stayed in Little Tokyo for a few days, before relocating to the beach. For the few days we were there, we would would grab breakfast or lunch at some cute little Japanese place and shop or visit temples before heading off to see more of the well known sites. My final recommendation for downtown is a great bookshop if losing yourself in books and comfy chairs is your idea of heaven, located on South Spring St is The Last Book Store a huge 2 floor loft space full of books of every description and is laid out like a living breathing art gallery of books, magical!

    

Beverly Hills. A city to the west of Hollywood with one of the most famous postcodes in the world 90210, it’s an experience to drive through, people watch and window shop for sure. You will see lots of familiar sights from tv, music and film, ultra expensive blacked out cars, paparazzi and shops that you need an appointment or A list status to enter. All the LA tour buses will drive you down Rodeo Drive and the surrounding area, past restaurants like The Ivy or the Beverly Hills Hotel, all places that are far too expensive for us mortals to shop, sleep or dine in, but exciting to see nonetheless. Close by are places such as The Grove, the Beverly Centre and my favourite The Farmers Market which are all far more accessible the average visitor, so I’d recommend people watching, walking a couple of blocks past all the fancy stores, but then head to shop and eat in one of the neighbouring malls instead, for a more thrifty way of experiencing Beverly Hills.

  

Every visit I have made to LA, I have never stayed in the same place for the entire trip, I spend time staying in the heart of Hollywood and then head across to the coast. This is partly because I usually never hire a car, so it saves on travelling (it can take 30-40+ minutes to get across town on a good day and you are looking at an hour+ on public transport) but I also like to have a few days exploring the shops, bars, museums in and around Hollywood, and then head to the coast as its a completely different vibe, and mindset.

Santa Monica is a city in itself, situated on the Pacific coastline, its a very walkable and bike friendly place, full of juice bars, shopping malls, cinemas, restaurants, spas, yoga studios, theatres and coffee shops. With palm trees spanning the famous Ocean Drive that you will have seen thousands of times before in the movies and of course the celebrated Santa Monica Pier, it feels a world away from the neon filled, billboard lined busy streets of West Hollywood. As well as exploring the famous Pier which has a ferris wheel, aquarium, restaurants, arcades and shops, spend time along Third Street Promenade where you will find more affordable shopping and restaurants than in Beverly Hills for sure and even a British Pub. Bike lanes and rental shops are everywhere, and you can easily travel up and down the coast line on designated bike lanes, south to Venice Beach or north towards Malibu, maybe try some surfing or paddleboard lessons, or if you are me just chill on the beach with a smoothie.

   

Venice Beach. It’s only a 30 minute walk from Santa Monica or a 10 minute car journey, but definately strap in for a completely different scene down here.  It’s the quirkier, eclectic, bohemian neighbour and always worth a visit, the world famous boardwalk is full of unique people, stalls and events. Keep an eye out for The Boardwalk Busker, along with the man who has a huge albino snake wrapped around his neck, mixed in with local musicians and artists showcasing their talents. The beach front is full of restaurants and bars, and its an experience to just sit down and witness all the craziness from behind the safety of a cold beer and some tacos. Make sure to walk as far down as Muscle Beach, to witness the bare chested weighlifters pumping iron in the sun, then head back a few blocks past the famous Jim Morrison mural to the quietly scenic canal area. Take time to wander the entire length of Abbot Kinney and explore Rose Avenue and Main St, which are full of coffee shops, boutique stores, and lots of original and unconventional restaurants and bars.

 


Others sights
– So much more to recommend, head up to Malibu for surfers, more beaches and great restaurants, take in the art and amazing views from the Getty, take a bar crawl at night along Sunset Strip and visit the incredible Universal Studios theme park afterwards watching a film and enjoying a meal at the Universal City Walk and maybe even book a studio tour at Warner Brothers the list goes on. . . . 

Bratislava and beyond 

Back to Europe for this post and my most recent trip, as I just got back a few days ago. I started visiting Europe more extensively a couple of years back, when I didn’t want to travel too far and for too long with dad being so ill, and so I became interested in the central and eastern regions of Europe, with its rich interconnecting histories, fascinating cultures and breathtaking landscapes. Slovakia is known as the country at the heart of Europe due to its geographical position, it is surrounded by Austria, Hungary, Czechia, Ukraine and Poland, and as I have already visited all of Slovakia’s neighbours, it was about time I paid a visit to the country in the middle connecting them all.

History Bit – The capital of the Slovak Republic is Bratislava but due to the history of the country and the fact that Slovakia only amicably split from Czechoslovakia in 1993, makes Bratislava one of the youngest capitals in Europe, but one with a long and interesting history that goes back beyond the 2nd century BC. This is definitely reflected in the sights dotted around the old town area of the city, that has a distinctly different feel than the rest of the capital.

  

Arrivals. We arrived at Bratislava airport late on a midweek evening, so armed with a telephone number from the hosts of our apartment we rang The Green Taxi company, who arrived quickly and dropped us off in the old town for €10. There are public transport options too and from the airport as well and we used them on our return the following week. Bus number 61 is the airport bus and takes around 20 mins to get to its final stop of the main train station, which is about a 20-25 min walk from the old town, if you don’t fancy the walk with your suitcase from the train station, the no1 tram goes from the train station & stops just outside the periphery of the historic centre. Catching the bus or tram is easy, you purchase a ticket prior to boarding (valid on both buses and trams) from a machine by the stop, and you purchase it according to the duration of trip, ie a 15 minute (0.70€) 30 (0.90€) or maybe a 60 minute trip (1.20€) and just validate the ticket using the machine on board.

Bratislava itself is very close to the Austrian, Hungarian & Czechia borders, and so you could easily travel in by using the extensive Train network that is all around this area. From Budapest a direct train takes about 2hr 40 minutes, from Brno in Czechia it takes just over 90 minutes and from Vienna in Austria around an hour. 

There is plenty to do over a long weekend here, with cathedrals, castles, churches, a clock tower, museums, the Danube river, an observation tower, & some really unique friendly coffee shops and restaurants as well as lots of pubs serving local beer and all the dumplings you can eat.

   Views from top & bottom of St Michaels Gate.

Sights. We stayed in an apartment close to St Michaels Gate, the only remaining gate left of this once heavily fortified city and this made a good base in which to visit the old town, but we were a close enough walk to the sites outside the walls.  As soon as you walk outside the mainly pedestrianised old town, there are lots of signposts helpfully directing you to the other sights and conveniences with lots of available tram and bus stops. Staying close to St Michaels Gate meant that it was one of the first sites we visited, you can visit the inside of the tower and climb to the top, to do so, the main entrance is to be found on the right of the gate from inside the old town.  As well as the not too strenuous climb to the top, there is the Museum of Arms spread over each floor on your way up, once at the top, there is a great view of the old town and a chance to get your bearings. Also, dont miss the zero kilometre plaque underneath the gate showing how many KM it is from Bratislava to other places on the globe.

One of the oldest buildings in Bratislava is the The Old Town Hall located on the largest square in the town, Hlavné Námestie. Inside is the large, informative Bratislava History Museum, which has really unusual artefacts including the shooting targets which are basically oil paintings on wood, and the building itself in which the museum is situated is grand and beautiful, be sure to check out the thick vaulted doors and intricate ceilings as well as climbing to the top of the tower, which provides a great vantage point to look over the square and towards the castle. 

   Looking up at the Old Town Hall on our sunny day and looking back down from the top of the tower on our rainy day.

Visable from all over the city is the spire of St Michaels Cathedral located in the south west of the old town, next to some of the original wall and across from the castle up on the hill. Quite a simple and gothic interior, it’s nowhere near as colourful or extravagant as some of the other cathedrals I have visited recently,  but it’s simplicity is part of its charm, as long as you time your visit to avoid the crowds arriving from the Danube cruise boats. As well as some impressive alters, you can also head downstairs to the crypt, and don’t forget the memorial to the now demolished synagogue outside in the square. 

 

Opposite the front door of the cathedral was a little alleyway with a sign advertising tea, if you follow the sign up along the historic wall you will find the most delightful outdoor Tea Bar selling hot and cold drinks, including Slovak Tea made with linden flowers. We ordered hot Slovakian tea and sat and watched the world go by for a good half hour here, a definite recommendation for when you need a little pause in your sightseeing, there was even little blankets ready for if the weather turned cold. 

 Hot Slovakian tea with linden flowers (squint and you can see St Martins spire top right)

Another place we stumbled upon whilst just exploring the streets, squares and small alleyways, was what turned out to be the Oldest Souvenir shop in the town with a small museum in the back. Well worth a look in, located just off Františkanske Namestie on Biela, close to the Old Town Hall, keep an eye out for the small sign out front leading you down a small side alley.

     

About a 10 minutes walk east outside the city walls, is the uniquely decorated, bright blue church of St Elizabeth. The walls, the roof, the shiny mosaics are all blue, I’ve never seen anything like it before, and it’s curved lines and colours reminded me of Gaudi. When we arrived, we were disappointed to find it was closed and only open for services, so check online when you are there for the worship times, we returned during the Sunday morning service and was pleased to find the interior is just as beautiful and unique as the exterior. 

    

Another place initially closed to visitors when we got there was The Palffy Palace,  although advertised as open, there seemed to be a private function happening which was a shame. The palace is home to the Bratislava City Gallery, but the real reason we wanted to visit was to see the Matej Kren Passage, an art installation comprising of around 15,000 books and looks surreal, we never got chance to return during our stay, but you always have to leave a reason to return right?

Towering up on a hill, looking down upon the capital over in the west of the city is Bratislava Castle, its impossible to miss and is a short but uphill walk from the old town walls and the Danube. The interior of the castle is currently undergoing a huge renovation project, so its not open to tourists, but the Museum of Slovak History is still available to visit, and the impressive grounds of the exterior are open and free and with its elevated position, there are superb views across the whole of the capital and beyond.

    

There is another castle that should be on anyone’s itinerary when visiting Bratislava and that is Devin Castle, which is a short and easy 20 minute bus ride from the Novy Most bus station, which is located under the Most SNP, this is the huge cable bridge with the observation tower on. The bus you need is the 29 (28 also goes there I believe)which when we caught it, left from the main road under the bridge on the old town side and not inside the actual station. This bus takes you straight into Devin and although there is a bus stop right by the castle, when we visited on a Saturday and in October, the bus only stopped on the main road and its then a short walk to the castle, I am presuming in summer when its busier, the bus has an extra stop right by the castle carpark. 

There are two main things to do when visiting this part of town, the castle and the ruins for sure, but there are some really nice and well signposted walking trails along the junction of the Morova and Danube rivers, this section of river also becomes the countries border, with the opposite shore being Austria. We made time to do both, but started with the castle and the museum that is situated inside the castle grounds, the upper part of the castle is closed for extensive renovations, but there was still a lot available to explore. The castle grounds are pretty big and encompass a field with donkeys, an excavation area with archologists hard at work &  leafy footpaths taking you to various medieval ruins along the way, including an amunitions store, a chapel & a workhouse. The castle itself is built high into the surrounding rock and well worth taking time to explore, the views from the top are magnificent and keep a look out for the many caves dotted into the cliff face. There are a few stalls selling souvenirs outside the main entrance, as well as a hotel and a few restaurants should you fancy a meal before heading back to the centre of Bratislava.

     

Eats and Drinks. Restaurants serving local beers, wine and traditional food are plentiful in the old town. We heard about a traditional place just outside the old town walls with great reviews on TripAdvisor called Bratislava Flagship Restaurant as we fancied at least one night sampling some regional dishes. The restaurant is huge, the largest in the capital, but friendly, casual, and suitable for large groups and solo/small groups, housed in a former cinema the building has a great atmosphere and is connected to a monastic brewery, so be sure to try the beer too. The menu covers all bases when it comes to Slovakian food, I had the garlic soup served in a bread bowl and then shared a dumpling platter for two with mum.  The majority of traditional Slovak dishes feature pork, it is possible to get vegetarian options but they will more than likely feature a lot of sheeps cheese, although there were some none traditional places we ate at that had great vegetarian and vegan options on the menu and the food was outstanding.

Enjoy Coffee was an absolute delight, we visited daily and sampled dishes from their breakfast, lunch and dinner menus as well as having coffee to go. The menu was fresh, healthy, with creative dishes such as buckwheat muesli, homemade bread with avocado spread, celery fries and courgette pasta, they had a great selection of coffees, teas and smoothies and served alcohol too. There was outdoor and indoor seating, with a children’s play area towards the back and friendly multilingual staff who always made us feel welcome. 

We stumbled upon Fach by accident as we were wet and cold once we returned from Devin and fancied some soup. This coffee bar, cafe, bakery and restaurant was a real surprise, their menu was really interesting, unique and simple, focussing on 15 seasonal dishes at a time. I ordered carrot soup, but it was actually carrot velouté, fermented ginger and hazelnuts, it was outstanding, it came with the dried, fermented and cooked ingredients in a bowl and then the waitress poured the warm soup on top, and priced at just over £5 it was probably the best soup I have ever tasted. It was only when we investigated afterwards that we realised the main chef trained and worked in Michelin starred restaurants prior to opening Fach, and it truely shows from the decor, the presentation and of course the food, but most of all it was friendly, inviting and perfect for 2 wet sightseers to warm up.

     

The final eating place I will rave about is Mondieu, there are 4 in Bratislava and we visited the bistro situated on Laurinska for our final brunch before heading to the airport. They specialise in coffees and chocolate but also have an extensive breakfast and lunch menu with lots of crepes, salads and sandwiches, I had the beetroot, hummus and avocado open sandwich and mum had the avocado and poached egg open sandwich both were fresh and delicious. They have a huge selection of speciality coffees, I had an espresso with raw cacao and mum had a beautifully presented coffee with chocolate, but the star of our last meal here was the dairy free lavender and blueberry ice cream from their vegan ice cream bar, it was to die for! Our mains cost around £5 each, the ice cream and coffees around £2 each and the staff were helpful and happy to let us sit with our suitcases and not feel in the way. 

   
Hot Tips –  

  • If you have an hour or so to kill with large bags and suitcases, then visit the Old Town Hall Tower and the Bratislava History Museum as there is a free bag store by the ticket desk.
  • Ice cream lovers head to the Laboratorie branch of Mondieu,  located on Laurinska down the road from the bistro, here they have an ice cream bar where you can design your own flavours and toppings.
  • Keep a look out for the many bronze statues dotted around the old town, including the old man peaking out of the drain, the paparazzi statue has been removed though, so dont spend a good hour wandering aroundlookimg for it like we did.
  • If you are into your “metal” there is a Metal Megastore close to Palffy Palace.

Other sights – UFO Observation Tower – Museum of Pharmacy – Museum of Clocks – Slavin War Memorial, a walk along the Danube or river cruise.

Always be polite 🙂 –  Thank you in Slovak is pronounced something like Dakujem (Da Qui Em) 

Kotor Bay – UNESCO town on the Adriatic

Sometimes I like to load up all my budget airline phone app’s, pick a date and see what’s on offer, which is sort of why we ended up (Mum & I) in Montenegro. I mean sort of, the country of the black mountains was on my radar, especially as over the last year I have been to a few countries in the Balkans, but also EasyJet started their first ever flights from Manchester to Tivat on the Montenegro Adriatic coast in March 17, so we booked on the inaugural flight and then started our research to see just exactly where we were off too. 

Bordered by Croatia, Bosnia Herzegovina, Albania, Serbia & Kosovo, it was actually joined with Serbia until 2006, when it then  became an independent country on its own, of course prior to 1992, it was part of Yugoslavia.

Arrivals. There are many ways to get into Montenegro, we flew direct from Manchester (just under 3 hrs), you can also fly direct into Tivat from Gatwick, or if you wanted to fly to the capital Podgorica, then at the moment, I think the only direct flights are also from Gatwick. There are no trains along the Adriatic Coastline, but you can travel via train from Belgrade, Serbia as far as Bar on the southern coast of Montenegro, and buses go direct from Dubrovnik in Croatia to Kotor and take between 2-4 hours. 

History Bit. There is a reason why EasyJet have started flights to Tivat and not the capital Podgorica for us intrepid tourists. The capital has undergone many changes over the past few years, it has been bombed to the ground a number of times, most recently during WWII, and some say its still struggling since the destruction of Yugoslavia and the imposed sanctions. It was rebuilt by the communists after WWII and as people have moved to the capital, it has expanded at a such a great rate that unfortunately the infrastructure needed to support the population has yet to catch up. Although there are churches and parks and museums in the capital, there are far more beautiful and historic sites less damaged by past wars elsewhere in the country, and Tivat and its neighbour the UNESCO Kotor are often recommended as a better place to use as a base, in which to explore this recently independent country.

Kotor Bay itself is a short but breathtaking taxi drive (10 mins) from the Tivat airport via a tunnel through Mount Vrmac and out into the bay. Kotor old town is enclosed by a wall and entirely pedestrianised and it’s here where we stayed, so our taxi driver dropped us off just by the town walls and then walked us the last couple of minutes to our hotel.  

Sights.This walled medieval city is steeped in history, with beautiful old terracotta tiled roofs, a fort up in the foothills of the surrounding mountains as well as a cathedral, churches, museums and tiny narrow streets leading into small square after small square, each one bringing a new discovery. Its not hard to see why its been awarded UNESCO status and why Norwegian, Caribbean and other cruise ships have a stop off here as they tour the Adriatic.  

As well as Kotor Bay itself, there are loads of places easily reachable for day trips, so you could easily pack a full itinerary to fill 5-7 days, but I’ll leave the day trips for another blog post, and stick to Kotor for this one. There are 3 main entrances to Kotor old town, so if you’re exploring from outside I’d just pick any and see where the alleys take you, for ourselves, we were staying already inside the walls, but used Sea Gate, the North Gate and South Gate as good landmarks so we always knew roughly where we were and which way our hotel was, the other main landmark we used was the Cathedral of St Tryphon.

Beautiful alleyways & the Cathedral 

The cathedral was built in 1166, damaged and then rebuilt during a massive earthquake, its worth visiting especially for the spectacular interior, with the detailed pieces of frescoes and a gold altarpiece inside. There are several other churches in the old town, St Luke, St Mary, St Clare and St Michael’s, you will more than likely stumble upon them as you navigate round the alley ways and squares and they are all worth a peak inside. 
The many squares dotted around are all connected by the alleyways which all have unusual names, such as, the Square of Milk and Square of Flour each one houses say a church or museum, some restaurants, and some shops, so it’s worth taking your time to wander and explore, its not chaotic as say the passageways of Marrakesh, so you wont get lost, promise!

The main square, Square of Weapons, is located at the entrance of the Sea Gate, not surprisingly there are lots of cafes and restaurants with outdoor seating here, as its the entrance that most tourists enter through. This gate is by the main road, a bus stop and it is where the cruise ships are moored, with that in mind, we felt that the restaurants were a bit more expensive here, so ate elsewhere.


We found a lovely group of restaurants around Pjaca Sv, Tripuna Square, they all had comfortable outdoor seating areas, friendly waiters and menus filled with a great selection of local dishes, each one with vegetarian options. We ate at Pescaria Dekaderon and Pizzeria City next door to each other, both places offering local and other Mediterranean dishes with inexpensive beer and wine. 

For coffee and deserts though, we stumbled upon a great little cafe chain called Mamma Mia, there was a small one inside the town walls, and a larger one just outside the North Gate, over two small bridges and turn left towards the shopping mall. Open till late, we came here one night just for the delicious cakes, and returned in the morning for coffee and a selection of the fresh, local, inexpensive burek pastries for breakfast, it was a great find!

sharing cake at Mamma Mia

Probably the highlight of our adventures in Kotor for me, was the hike up to the remains of the medieval St John’s Fort which was built on the side of the mountain to protect the city. There is a path that can be easily walked up, remember to take a hat, good shoes, sun cream and some water though,  but we did see some locals selling a few refreshments along the way if you forget. It takes about 30-40 mins to walk but take your time to enjoy the views and visit the Chapel of Our Lady of Health along the way,  its a church with a dome bell tower which used to house stationed troops. It’s easy to find the start of the walk, its signposted by one of the little alleyways close to the North gate and St Mary’s church. Top Tip – set off early morning before it starts to get hot and before the cruise ship inhabitants get there.  I remember speaking to some tourists from the cruise ship who were just setting off up the path as we were almost back down, they were hot and thirsty and wearing sandals, they didn’t think they had the energy to make it all the way to the fort, which was a shame as the views were stupendous. 

Climbing up to the fort
Looking down

Views from the top.

One feature of Kotor you will not be able to ignore is the amount of cats the old town has. Speaking to the locals, it appears the cats originally arrived here from the many ships all over the world that have moored in the bay. With the old town being free from cars, it has allowed the cats to stay out of harms way, and wandering around you see cats hiding from the sun under the bushes and doorways of the churches, and dotted outside many of the little shops are bowls of cat food, they are most certainly well looked after. They have become a bit of a tourist attraction in themselves, with some shops offering cat themed merchandise and there is even a cat museum, with the entrance fee being used to support the feline community with food and vet bills. We really wanted to visit the museum, but it’s not open all year round and we missed the April opening date by a couple of weeks. 

 Just a few of the cats of Kotor.
It’s also nice to wander outside the old city walls, and for someone who’s never been on a cruise ship, it was a bit of a novelty seeing them up close and watching them manoeuvre themselves in and out of the bay, head just outside the Sea Gate for the best place to see them. Just outside this gate is also a tourist information centre, a cafe/restaurant with lots of perfectly situated seating areas to watch across the bay, as well as a market that stretches along the outside of the walls, with fruit, vegetables, clothes and crafts. It’s also a nice place for a walk in the evening and to watch the sunset across the bay.
 One of many cruise ships in the bay 
       Views across the bay

There is still a lot more to do just in and around Kotor, and it’s only a short walk to the main bus station where you can get buses to neighbouring countries such as Albania, Serbia and Croatia, as well as many other places within Montenegro, including some really interesting places close enough for day trips, which I’ll write up soon.

Other sights. Pima Palace, walk the city walls, and go to the maritime museum, try the Niksicko beer and the local goats cheese and burek pastries for breakfast!

Always be polite. 🙂  Please “Molim”, Thank You “Hvala”, Good Morning “Dobro Jutro”, Hello “Zdravo”

The Old North State and BBQ

US State No 3

I have visited North Carolina and in particular its capital Raleigh 3 times, on account of having friends there. But to be honest, I haven’t seen that much of this US State that stretches from the Appalachian Mountains in the west to the Atlantic Ocean in the east.

The only place in the UK that you can fly direct to the capital Raleigh-Durham is not surprisingly London Heathrow. But with a bit of playing around, you can pretty much get there via a stop off from any other airport, for example if you flew from Edinburgh and changed at Newark, you can be there in just under 12 hours and Birmingham via Paris to Raleigh-Durham takes just under 13 hours, you can also fly direct from London To Charlotte.

I have flown once to Raleigh from Manchester via Philadelphia, but the other two times, I was visiting other places on the east coast and arrived via the Atlantic Coastal Route Amtrak Train, once picking it up in Trenton, New Jersey (8hrs 20) and another time from Washington DC (6hrs). So if you like trains (like I do) and time is your friend, then I would suggest kicking back, bring a good book and some snacks and take the train, otherwise air travel is the best way to go. 

North Carolina is bordered by South Carolina (not surprisingly), Georgia, Tennessee, Virginia and of course the Atlantic Ocean, so although its not necessarily known as a leading tourist destination for us Europeans, when touring this part of the US there is certainly a rich enough culture and history to merit a stop off point on a road trip. 

My friends live in the capital, so it is here where I have stayed each time, and we tend to hang out at their favourite local spots, with a few day trips thrown in for good measure. I would say a car is an essential, and I was lucky enough to have the use of my friends car each visit. Other cities which are within driving distance for a South East road trip which would encompass North Carolina could be Atlanta, Charleston and Richmond. I did a southern states trip by Greyhound one year, but that’s for another blog, all my North Carolina visits have mainly been to the coast and around the capital.

Taking the Amtrak down the East Coast

So why visit North Carolina unless you have business or friends and family here? Well, its the place where the Wright Brothers had their first successful flight, Pepsi and Krispy Kreme donuts where invented here, its the home of NASCAR Hall of Fame and of course Barbecue! When I first visited the South, my friends kept saying they wanted to take me ‘for Barbecue’, I had visions of us standing outside in their back garden, huddled round a smoky steel bbq burning sausages and potatoes (with less rain and umbrellas), but Barbeque in the US has a whole different meaning. It is still slow cooked meat over an open fire, but especially in the southern states, it refers to pulled pork and how it is marinated, its the marinade that is the important distinction here, with even different parts of N Carolina never mind the neighbouring states having their own Regional Barbecue Sauces

So, one of the things you must try if passing through N Carolina is a Barbecue restaurant, of which there are many.  I remember visiting Smithfields on pretty much every visit (I was eating meat probably daily back then) its a BBQ chain exclusive to N.C. be sure to try some hush puppies too which is deep fried cornmeal, perfect for soaking up the BBQ Sauce. Don’t eat meat? There are more and more veggie and vegan options popping up nowadays, with the Ficton Kitchen in Raleigh and Luella’s in Asheville offering pork free BBQ. 

Another thing  I remember doing in the Raleigh-Durham area was an Art Walk, as my friend I was staying with is a painter.  As well as chatting to the artists and seeing their work, there was music, food and drink, with free samples everywhere, we had a great evening chatting with local painters, trying out crafts and sampling the free wine and snacks. 

You will always have a great time in a local bar in the states, especially if you ‘aren’t from around these parts’ and having a British accent will probably at least score you a free pint! Although my accent didn’t stop us from coming close to last in the weekly quiz night!

Quiz Night!
 

Next time I visit I must do some more tourist spots in the capital, but mainly we ate, shopped and hung out in my friends gorgeous house, and at the pool club,  one year I even helped with a garage sale. 

My friend is a beach lover, so we had a day trip over to the Atlantic Coast, and to Wilmington, a port side town on the South East Coast. There are lots of lovely shops, restaurants and cafes just a short walk from the beach, and we spent some time exploring Cape Fear Riverwalk. I had my first and probably last ever salt water taffy, despite the name of the sweet, it doesn’t actually contain any salt, but I found it an acquired taste none the less. 

Dipping my feet in the Atlantic Ocean, warmer than the European side!

One thing that I thought was strange was the number of gifts featuring the cast of Dawson’s Creek, until I realised it was filmed here, I am not aware of any official tours, but its an easy search on the internet for all the TV shows memorable locations if you fancied a self guided tour.

I plan to return at some point to NC, so I will aim to do more research and visit some more sites during trip number 4.

Other North Carolina spots.

NASCAR Hall of Fame – Charlotte  $25 adult
Wright Brothers National Monument Kill Devil Hills  $7 adult 
Drive the Blue Ridge Parkway FREE  and hike in the Great Smokey Mountains National Park FREE

New York City, Buffalo and a teeny bit of Canada

US State No1

7

I have been to New York 3 times, once in spring, once in winter and once in summer, I don’t have a trip to the Big Apple in Autumn planned yet, but maybe I should pop it back on my ever growing bucket list.
My last trip to New York was in the summer of 2007, so this blog post will not be an up to date, must do list of New York sites by any means. Ask anyone though and if they haven’t been to New York City themselves, they will probably know someone who has or is going and really, you could just turn up in Times Square and figure it out as you went along. There isn’t anything that hasn’t already been said about this amazing city and it should be on everyone’s travel list.

Although I had been twice before, I used New York as the starting point when I travelled overland solo from NY to LA & onward to Hawaii. As well as being probably the cheapest place to fly from Manchester, UK to the East coast, the flight is relatively short and jet lag isn’t too demanding. As I was familiar with the city, I thought I could use a couple of days in Manhatten to chill, visit a few things I hadn’t seen previously and just get myself mentally in the headspace to take off across the country alone.

Central Park & Times Square

My first time alone in New York, I enjoyed sitting in Central Park with an ice cream and a book, just people watching and soaking up the atmosphere, without needing to race through the city getting all the tourist spots done, especially in the oppressive summer heat. I was staying in a cheap motel with a shared bathroom close to the Natural History Museum and I was able to pencil in an entire morning to roam the corridors and exhibits of the museum and it was wonderful.

A 20 minute walk across Central Park is the Guggenheim,  another space I hadn’t visited on previous trips, I really should have been before. The building is outstanding, an iconic structure with the most amazing spiral ramp inside that you slowly climb up as you view the works of art. The only other thing I really made an effort to do on this trip was to visit an outdoor market, there are loads in and around Manhatten, I was there over a weekend, so on the Sunday, I had a wander around the Green Flea Market and picked up a few items of clothing for the journey ahead and had some delicious inexpensive street food.

But my trip to the state of New York wasn’t over, next stop was to Penn Street Station to board the Amtrak train, and I headed about 8 hours north west to Buffalo, NY. Located on the shore of Lake Erie, this city is actually New York’s second most populous city after NYC and is a great base to use if you want to visit Niagara Falls, the amazing meeting point of 3 waterfalls, that connect the USA & Canada. I stayed at the Hostel Buffalo and as I check back now, it looks like it unfortunately may be closing down *signs petition* It was from here that I got the Greyhound bus to Niagara as it’s another 20 miles to the Falls. It’s a lot cheaper to stay in Buffalo than by the Falls themselves and buses run cheaply and regularly throughout the day Bus Bud.

Photo 12-06-2016, 19 00 55

Absolutely breathtaking, the sites and sounds of this majestic natural wonder, it can be viewed from both sides of the border. The American side is actually a State Park, so as well as visiting the Falls, there are lots of hiking trails and gardens to explore along with shops, cafes & restaurants too. It was very easy to cross the border into Canada as the two countries are joined by the Rainbow Bridge,  as trivial as it looks, it is an actual bonefide border crossing, so have your documentation ready & be prepared to pay a small fee of $.50 each way if you are walking or biking.

Canadian Passport Stamp!

 

I stayed about an hour or so on the Canadian side, grabbed some lunch and visited the Skylon Tower for amazing views from up high, before paying my $.50 to re-enter the US. (I don’t feel I can cross Canada off my list or count it as a country Ive visited as it’s such a big country and I barely ventured quarter of a mile across the border, so I plan to return!)

To get a real sense of the enormity of the Falls, I wanted to get closer, so despite it being a sunny day, a poncho was still required, as I bought tickets for Cave of the Winds and Maid of the Mist. Cave of the Winds consists of a series of wooden walkways that take you down the rocky waterside and only a few feet away from the gushing torrents, prepare to get wet, windy and metaphorically but not literally blown away. No time to dry off, I then boarded the famous Maid of the Mist for the boat tour, that takes you right up to the white raging water and full of the spray of the overflowing rivers, it was fun, wet and truly memorable. A full day is definitely needed, and I’m so glad I made the effort to get there. After drying off and a good nights sleep, I boarded the train to back to NYC & then onward to Pennsylvania.

Aboard the Maid of the Mist

 

Museum of Natural History – Open daily  (closed just Thanksgiving & Christmas Day)

Guggenheim – closed on Thursdays (pay what you wish on Saturdays 5.45-7.45)

Maid of the Mist– Appears to be closed for tours between Nov & April, and the Cave of the Winds  is closed for restoration every November, so I would always suggest checking the websites before a visit.

Dont Miss –  Statue of Liberty, Central Park, Empire State Building, Times Square, High Line, Ellis Island.