Pastries & Mermaids in Copenhagen 🇩🇰

Returning to Copenhagen on the train from our trip across the Øresund, we dropped our bags off at the Cabinn City Hotel and eagerly headed out to explore this historic capital city.

Only staying for a couple of nights, it would just be enough time to get a taster of the place, so we had to prioritise what we wanted to see and eat and with city map in hand, we set off.

To get our bearings, we made our way to the City Hall Square or Rådhuspladsen a huge public square that was full of people making the most of the sunny weather, little craft stalls and food huts created a welcoming atmosphere. We did a quick loop of the square, passing the city hall building, the dragon fountain, and the Hans Christian Andersen statue, planning (but failing) to return later that weekend.

High on my list of things to see was the Little Mermaid statue at Langelinie Pier. Erected in 1913 the statue commemorates the fact that the Hans Christian Andersen story was not only written but also published here in Copenhagen in 1837 and is now a top tourist attraction. Made even more special for me as I reading it and more of Andersens fairy tales during my stay, as I often like to read a famous book or two from places I am travelling in.

Disclaimer – I look back now and realise just how much we missed on our whistle stop tour, but it was more about 2 friends reconnecting and having a quick city break, than a full on sightseeing weekend, but reviewing the photos 5 years later, I know I need to return to see more.

At the time, I had a colleague who had family living in Copenhagen, so before the trip she had given me a list of places to eat and drink, so in need of a good pastry, we made our way to one of the branches of The Coffee Collective.

A danish pastry and cup of mocha, Copenhagen, Denmark
Mocha and a Danish, Coffee Collective, Copenhagen

With a chain of shops all over Copenhagen, including one housed in an old telephone booth, the collective have won numerous awards including gold in the world barista championships and with the coffee freshly roasted on site, you would expect it to deliver, and it did. If I had brought a bigger travel bag, I would have been tempted to taken a jar back home, but instead we ordered our pastries and sat back to soak up the culture.

It was only a short walk from the coffee shop to Assistens Cemetery but probably not far enough to burn off the pastries unfortunately. So we explored the tree lined paths across the park, making time to pet any local dog I could find, before locating the graveyard. Famous for being the final resting place of many notable Danes, including Hans Christian Andersen, disappointingly though his grave had been defaced with graffiti.

There are three rectangular lakes in the city, so with the sun still shining and our feet holding up, we followed the locals and went for a afternoon stroll around the waters edge, crossing bridges, admiring the incredible buildings along the shoreline and dodging cyclists of which there were plenty.

That evening we lost ourselves in the magical wonder of one of the most visited amusement parks in the world, Tivoli Gardens. Built in the 1800’s parts of the park, (deceptively right in the heart of the city centre), have a vintage feel, the fountains, the flowers, the food stalls, the gardens. But don’t be fooled, there are some serious rides here too, like the Demon and the Golden Tower that shoots you 63 meters high up into the sky, before dropping you back down again.

Visiting at night time, we got to experience the more sedate parts of the park, especially with the gardens all light up, it was serene and quiet, until the loud roar of a rollercoaster nearby rudely brought you back to reality. We then spent far too much time deciding which stall to eat dinner and which stall to eat dessert, it was a tough job but we finally went for the family run Vaffelbageriet for a late night treat of sugary pastries and hot chocolate. Then to work off the sugar high, we explored the shopping area, from the Lego store, to the souvenir shops and trying not to fall in love with absolutely everything on display in the Danish lifestyle stores, I absolutely love all things Scandi when it comes to homewares and design and it felt like we were at ground zero. I made a mental note to increase the shopping budget for my return trip.

We started our 2nd morning as we meant to go on with more pastries, how could we not, being in the land of the multilayered, sweet breads known at least to outsiders as ‘the Danish’. We headed to another recommended bakery for our breakfast, the delicious and organic Emmerys.

We then spent an hour indulging our Nordic Noir obsession at the time, by visiting some of the sites featured in both The Killing and The Bridge, including the Police Headquarters only a short walk from our hotel. Many tour guides now offer bespoke Nordic Noir walking tours if you really want to get deep into the genre, but again we were short on time and our budget was tight. We had achieved our goal of travelling across ‘the bridge’, so a few photos of recognisable buildings and streets would have to do for this trip.

One place I did want to make time for was the unique, alternative community known as Freetown Christiania. Originally a former military barracks, when they moved out in 1971 local homeless moved into the vacant buildings and the families from the nearby neighbourhood transformed some of the land into a children’s play area. Within a few weeks, the entire space had been proclaimed a free town, appealing to people across many communities, including ‘hippies’, anarchists, artists and all people looking for a more communal and collective way of living.

50 years on, this place has now become one of the most visited tourist attractions in the city. You can take guided tours, or a take a self guided walk, as we did, exploring the amazing and colourful self built dwellings, workspaces, craft shops, art galleries, concert halls, nightclubs and cafes. We cautiously walked along Pusher Street, the notorious area where cannabis is bought and sold, obeying the rules to not photograph a single thing, took a lovely sunlit nature walk around the lake, admired local art on display pretty much everywhere and finished up with lunch in a cafe.

It was late afternoon by the time we were leaving, passing by the spiral topped Church of Our Saviour, adding yet another thing I need to visit when I can make a return trip.

With a few gifts left to buy, we explored the fascinating and colourful area of Nørrebro which had piqued our interest the previous day when we visited the cemetery. As well as little independent stores and vintage shops, coffee houses and restaurants, there was some incredible street art too, there was a real vibrant feel to the place, too much to explore in the short time we had.

Our final stop had to be the world famous flagship Lego Store, not to buy anything particularly, but to marvel at the largest toy company in the world. Inside as well as boxes and boxes of every kind of lego block you could image, there were large scale replicas of pirates and cycling Danes, as well as reconstructions of local landmarks of the city all built from those little plastic infamous blocks, it felt like the perfect place to finish our sightseeing for the weekend.

Settling down for our final meal and a local beer, I tried to take in all that we had squeezed into our long weekend, covering two different cities, across two different countries. Short and sweet, increasing my fascination and appreciation for all things Scandi, while quietly hoping I would be lucky enough to return someday to explore some more.

COFFEE AND CAKE – the Coffee Collective we visited was the one on Jægersborggade, only a short walk from Assistens Cemetery. We loved Emmerys too, with a number of locations both in Copenhagen and Århus, they serve both breakfast and lunch, with an amazing selection of cakes and pastries.

EATS – If you are visiting Christiania, definitely plan to stay for lunch, there were some quirky indie places to eat and drink, we ate our lunch outside at Grønsagen and had their buffet lunch. We also combined our trip to Tivoli with our evening meal to save time, the Tivoli Food Hall is slightly separate to the actual gardens, so you can enter here for free to eat and drink, paying an entrance fee only if you then want to venture into the amusement park itself. Next time though I am saving up to try and get a spot at the world famous Noma.

TOP TIP – Plan for at least 3 nights, which we didn’t, ha! Writing up my travel journals on this blog is just a personal place for me to reflect on all my journeys to date, but this particular post has made me realise there was so much more I have to see, so hopefully there will be a Copenhagen part 2. Copenhagen is an expensive city though and although there are lots of cheap flight options, accommodation prices are often anything but. If you go when the weather is likely to be warm, there are loads of free things to do outside, all the parks, lakes, markets and if you are staying for a few days, and want to cram a lot in, its probably best to invest in a Copenhagen Card.

ALWAYS BE POLITE – Tak – ‘Thank you’, Hej – ‘Hello’, you can also use Hej Hej for ‘Goodbye’

Crossing The Bridge to Malmö 🇸🇪

It wasn’t my first trip to Sweden, I had actually been a couple of times previously, out in the countryside, close to the Norwegian border, when my parents used to visit a couple of times a year to hike and canoe. I was never as into outdoor pursuits as they were though, and I remember one cabin we stayed in, it was a 30 minute drive to the nearest town, my parents loved it, but for me it was too remote.

So I had always fancied returning and to somewhere a bit more lively and after a friend and I became obsessed with the Scandi-Noir TV show The Bridge, we booked a two centre long weekend, to visit Copenhagen and then travelling across ‘The Bridge’ to visit Malmö.

Although Malmö does have an airport, there are no flights from the UK, but luckily for us, there are many cheap flights from its neighbour over the water in Copenhagen. Once you land, you can catch the train from Terminal 3, and in 24 minutes costing only £11 you can arrive in Sweden’s 3rd largest city.

Of course there is the small matter of Øresund, the 73 mile body of water acting as the border between the two countries, but that’s no bother for the train, as it travels across on the the Øresund Bridge. As seen on the TV show and what prompted my interest in visiting this region, the bridge allows both car and train travel across the 7.5 miles from Copenhagen Airport to Malmö. But what I really loved and was excited about was that for the first 2.5 miles after leaving Copenhagen Airport, you travel underground through a tunnel. Once you pop up and into the daylight, you are on the manmade island of Lernacken in Sweden in the middle of the strait, with the final 5 miles spent travelling high up on the bridge itself, before returning to dry land in Malmö.

By the the time we arrived it was mid afternoon so we dropped our bags off at the hotel, and as it was warm and sunny we grabbed a local beer, people watched and took in our surroundings, happy to be back in Scandinavia.

We didn’t really have an agenda for our trip, if I had been travelling solo or with mum, we would have had a long list of everything we fancied seeing, all the local historic sites, traditional restaurants etc. But this was a semi-relaxing city break, with my friend who was coming out the other side from a painful divorce, having to renew her passport just to come along. So our plan was to chill, soak up the local culture, geek out on Scandi-Noir television and catch a few historic sights along the way.

We spent the remainder of our afternoon exploring Gamla Staden the ‘old town’ and wandering though the 3 main squares and along the canal. It was June, the weather was beautiful and everybody seemed keen to enjoy the outdoors and the warm temperature.

Along our travels we passed a proud statue of famed Swedish business man and founder of Malmö, Frans Suell. We spotted the The Knotted Gun a poignant non-violence statue which was erected after the murder of John Lennon and intrigued by the twisted skyscraper dominating the skyline, found ourselves curiously wandering around the base of the Turning Torso. All the while exploring local market stalls, gift shops and stopping for the obligatory coffee and cake along the way.

That evening, we found a lovely local restaurant with stodgy food and decent beer and got stuck in, finishing the night off with a walk through Lilla Torg, the historic small square for a nightcap.

The next day we started slowly by going for a swim and then sauna, although the home of sauna is of course its neighbour Finland, Sweden does still have a real appreciation for the practice. I had many happy memories of my previous trips to Sweden when we stayed in log cabins complete with saunas, it became a daily ritual, one that I still miss to this day.

Once cooled off and fully clothed again, we headed out and ended up window shopping in a large mall, the food court was pretty impressive and so we stopped for coffee and pastries, as hunger started to hit after our earlier swim.

By early afternoon the sun was out and it was glorious, we were to leave later that day, but still had time to take a walk along the waterfront and through some of the parks, including the Kungsparken and Slottstradgarden. All around the area was full of dog walkers, cyclists, families picnicking and children running around, it had a real friendly, welcoming feel. We passed beautiful fountains, a windmill, and saw Malmö Castle, which we didn’t have time to explore, but I know Sweden is a place I have to see more of, so I made a mental note to return in the future.

Taking one last look across the Strait, the Øresund Bridge glistening in the sunshine, I could see the cars and the train making their journeys between the two countries, that I had seen so many times on TV. Then it was our turn, we took a quick detour to collect our bags, then returned to Malmö Station ourselves, to board the train and cross the bridge back over to Denmark.

TOP TIP – If I’d had a bit more time I definitely would had visited Malmö Castle which is now a cultural heritage museum. I also would have popped into Absmaland for some sustainable home furnishings (I will have to bring a bigger bag next time) finishing off with a vegan lunch in the cafe.

EATS – We ate at Bullen which had a great specials board, including meatballs with lingonberries and an impressive beer list. Next time though, I’m heading to The Veganbar for a burger!

COFFEE AND CAKE – We enjoyed coffee and cake in the food hall at Triangeln shopping mall, although Café Holmgången is on my list if I return, its vegan and dog friendly, always a double win in my book.


ALWAYS BE POLITE – ‘Tack’- Thank You, Hallå – Hello.