Heysham Coastal Walk

After leaving Sunderland Point we headed back towards Overton, took a left and about 15 minutes later we were pulling into the main carpark in the neighbouring Lancashire coastal town of Heysham.

Needing a bit of a pick me up, we made our first port of call the popular Curiosity Corner Cafe  right on the main high street. It was ‘cash only’ on the day we visited, luckily it’s only a short jog back to the carpark, if like me you needed to go hunt for some spare change. I don’t think this was a permanent thing though, but bring some money just in case.  It’s dog friendly with bowls of water available for your furry friends and so we sat outside with a couple of nice coffees and planned our next move, picking up a free courgette as we left, from their veg box out front.

Once refreshed we followed the sign to St Peter’s Church, an incredibly old building, with parts of it dating as far back at the 8th century, with evidence that there may have been a previous church on the site even before then. The graveyard outside makes for an interesting wander, and the wild coastal views were spectacular.

Next to the church is Glebe Garden, a small neglected space of woodland, carefully tended and brought back to life by the locals. There are statues, memorial seats, tiny fairies and toadstools hidden all around giving the place a peaceful, magical feel, as well as beautiful flowers including the red rose of Lancashire of course.

Next it was back up the path and to the Saxon St Patrick’s chapel, now a ruin, it stands above St Peter’s Church, overlooking Morecambe Bay. Although the building dates back from around the 8th century, there has been activity at this site a lot longer than that, there are some incredibly cool graves cut into the rock which have been excavated and are estimated to be about 1300 year old!

From there, there’s a footpath that takes you along the coast line with parts of it leading down to little patches of beach. So we headed off with our excited furry companion for a windy but stunning coastal walk, with the ferry terminal in the distance preparing for the next trip over to the Isle of Man.

This whole coastal area is actually a free National Trust site, and absolutely deserves it, there is a lot of history around here for those interested, and the national trust website has a trail walk you can download if you really want to immerse yourself. Instead of walking back the way we came, we took a detour through Rectory Woods, a sort of walled garden with stone steps and plenty of distractions and smells for the dog.

It was then a short walk back to the centre of town, past the Heritage Centre, to Tracy’s Homemade Pies & Cakes, who do a good selection of dairy free treats and I picked up some cake to take back home, would be rude not too!

By then, the fresh air was taking its toll, feeling tired, we all bundled back into the car and slowly made our way back home, and although it was only an hour away, it really felt like we have travelled a lot further to this lesser known Lancashire beauty spot.