Sunday hike around Anglezarke

Anglezarke, White Coppice and Great Hill Circular

I’ve done parts of this walk all seperately, in this area of Lancashire close to Chorley. I’ve taken a nice stroll through White Coppice the little village that once was a busy industrial part of the county. I’ve done a windy dog walk up to Great Hill and back, starting over in Brinscall, and I’ve also parked up at the Anglezarke reservoir for a explore with mum, but this particular time, one of the Bee Sober hikers planned a 15km loop trail linking up all three.

It had been raining heavily the night before, so after a quick fumble with some borrowed gaiters, I finally managed to strap them to my walking boots, double check I had enough snacks & the 3 of us headed off. Having done shorter versions of this walk with my 70 year old mother, it didnt really twig at first that the estimated 2 hours to complete the hike was completely unrealistic, until after closer interrogation from one of the other walkers, our leader admitted he has miscalculated and had based the timings on a trail run and not a casual hike, involving photo stops, lunch and carefully negotiating patches of boggy moorland. Not that any of that mattered, we were all in for the hike regardless, but knowing it was going to take double the time, us ladies on the walk, just limited our water intake, in case we didnt find anywhere discrete enough to pee. (Which reminds me, I must order a shewee!)

The first stage of the hike involves as easy to follow paved road, a babbling brook, remains of a lead mine and a memorial to an air crash in 1943, and a stunning landscape of the lancashire moors beyond.

 

It was then that the borrowed gaiters came into thier own, after bravely following our designated leader across a field of cows, we headed off across the rather wet moorland. First heading for Round Loaf, said to possibly be a prehistoric burial site, its a great spot to stop and take stock of the journey so far. There are amazing views across to Winter Hill and the rest of the moors from atop the mound, and from here you’ll see other hikers on the many other trails that link up in the area, including the Lancashire Way.

 

Next it was across more boggy moorland to join up with the path to Great Hill, where we stopped for a quick lunch. Quick because it was quite windy and it can get quite cold sitting on the stone bench at the summit, but again the views were worth it.

Then it was a slow descent towards White Coppice, when the rainclouds opened, but it made for an atmospheric, misty walk along the quarry and the Dean Black Brook waterfalls.

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Then ignoring the one dead sheep along the side of the path, we headed back round towards Anglezarke, passing the reservoir and back to the carpark, just totalling over 4 hours in all, including our stop for lunch. It was then time to head home for a hot shower and straight into my PJ’s for what was left of  the afternoon, there is nothing like that tiredness that comes with being outdoors for the day, perfect!

 

 

 

 

Pendle Hill, Lancashire

Although I’ve lived in NW England my whole life, and Pendle Hill is famous in this area, and one you can see for miles around, I’ve never actually hiked it until today. Although in this pandemic, the region has the ‘very high’ Tier 3 restrictions, we can still meet in proper outdoor spaces (i.e. not someones back garden) in groups of up to 6. So 5 of us met on a cool but sunny October Sunday morning, for a 2 hour hike with the Bee Sober Manchester hiking group.

Quite a steep ascent, that came as a bit of a shock, and made me wonder if all those squats i’d been doing with my online workouts had actually done any good. But once we approached the summit, it levelled off and the views across Lancashire and over to Yorkshire were stunning. So many more hikes and hills in the distance, gave us all plenty of ideas for future hikes.

Pendle Hill is actually famous in the area for being the place of witch trials in the 1600’s and a couple of months ago, myself and friend booked on a witches walk in the nearby village of Newchurch, which I guess I’ll write up later. But today, our hiking group met up a little further over in Barley, there’s a free carpark (donation box optional), meeting at 10AM we managed to get a parking space, but it must have been 3/4 full at that time already, there are also toilets and a cafe on site, so its a pretty popular meeting spot.

We took the long way round walking towards the Lower Ogden reservoir, before taking a tough ascent across fields, and then joining the path to the summit. We then headed straight down on the paved path, meeting a lot of weary looking hikers making thier way up. Although we complained (or at least I did) how tough our ascent was, it actually looked pretty tame compared to the more direct but steeper ascent that goes up the Pendle Way.

Just over 2 hours later, we were back down, and having lunch and a coffee sat outside at the carpark cafe and I was home mid afternoon, for a rest on the sofa, perfect.

 

Lancashire Lass – Preston

I was born in Lancashire 42 years ago, so it seems appropriate to start my travels across the UK here. If we are getting technical, I no longer live in Lancashire, I now live in Merseyside, prior to that I was in Greater Manchester and hopefully soon, I will be returning to Greater Manchester (that’s a whole other blog post!).  But prior to 1974 (before I was born I might add) Lancashire covered a much larger area in the North West and actually included, Salford and Liverpool where I have since lived. When I started to draw up the number of counties I needed to visit though, I’m using the current list with the amended boundary changes, so that would mean including visiting cities that don’t seem to be linked to a specific county anymore like Bristol and making a separate visit to the Isle of White which is no longer part of Hampshire. But anyway, back to Lancashire. .

I visit Lancashire pretty much weekly, but I wanted to dedicate a day to exploring it ‘Consciously’. Dad was still in hospital at the time, so after we had checked up on him, mum and I headed to the town where I was born – Preston and what seemed a good place to start, the museum of Lancashire for the history bit. 


I am quite a fan of a local history museum, especially if I’m on a city break somewhere, as it’s a great place to gem up on the history and traditions of the place you’re exploring in a short space of time.  Although I have just checked the website of the Lancashire Museums and it seems this particular museum is now closed except for school trips, which is a shame. 

Mum and myself then headed out of the city centre, down London Road and over towards Hoghton, to a place we had driven past many times over the years, but had never explored before; Hoghton Tower. We chose Hoghton Tower not just because it was somewhere we had never ventured before, but also because of the recommended views across Lancashire and the rather impressive guest list of this Grade I listed building, which has included over the years, William Shakespeare, Charles Dickens and King James I, who I’ll come back to in a minute.

Mum had booked us on a private tour of the building, which took around around 2 hours & cost £8 each. This fortified hill top Manor House still retains a real sense of history and I especially enjoyed the banquet hall, the dolls houses and exploring the dark and musty cellars.  Our tour guide was extremely knowledgeable, friendly and had a real sense of pride at showing us around, but I don’t think you can just turn up for a tour though, you always have to book in advance. There is also a large garden and a tea room that serves a very popular afternoon tea. We didn’t have an afternoon tea during this visit, but have since returned  and it was indeed delicious. There seems to be a busy calendar of events too, from farmers markets to outdoor plays and I believe this can have an impact of your visit regarding parking etc, so I would always recommend ringing or checking online before you visit.

By this time we had worked up an appetite and with a roast dinner in mind, (well it was a Sunday) we only needed to cross the road to The Sirloin Pub, which has its own connection to the tower. Rumour has it, that when King James I stayed at the tower on his way down to London, he enjoyed one of the banquets there so much, he ended up knighting the loin of beef, Sir Loin, and so the term for this cut of beef was named.

The pub across the road, plays homage to this and serves a very well made sirloin roast dinner, among many other local dishes like hot pot, we sat by the roaring open fire and tickled the pub dogs, before heading back home. 

Museum of Lancashire – no longer open to the public

Hoghton Tower – booking essential for tours and afternoon teas

Sirloin Pub – Open daily

Other Preston spots – Harris Museum & Art Gallery, Avenham Park, Brockholes Wetland & the British Commercial Vehicle Museum.

Expect I’ll be posting more about Lancashire in the future, as writing this blog has given me a taste to explore my home county some more.