Chester – The Roman Walled City.

When I decided that I wanted to visit every county in the UK, Cheshire was an easy early choice, as it’s so close to where I’m living now. Situated in the North West area of England, it borders many other counties, Merseyside, Greater Manchester, Derbyshire, Staffordshire and Shropshire as well as Wales to the West. 

The capitol is the historic Chester and is only around 19 miles & 42 minutes by direct train from Liverpool, 42 miles from Manchester and roughly 1.30hrs by train and 183 miles from London, which takes around 2hrs by direct train. I drove via the Mersey Tunnel on my last visit and made good use of one of 4 Park and Rides dotted around the city, we used the one by Chester Zoo and buses leave every 10 minutes to the centre of Chester, and it’s £2.00 return, easy! 

We landed nice and early in Chester, and so headed over to a lovely independant coffee shop called Cinderbox Coffee on Bridge Street, which served a good range of breakfast pastries, sandwiches as well as dairy free coffee, their cakes looked good too, but as it was only around 9.30am when we stopped by, I managed to resist.  Once warmed up and caffeinated, myself and my fellow county explorer Jane headed over to the Town Hall Visitor Information Centre to meet our tour guide.

There is over 2000 years of history to explore in Chester, and only so many hours in the day, so we prebooked on the popular Chester Walking Tour which departs daily all year round at 10.30am with an extra afternoon walk at 2pm between Easter and the end of October. The walk takes about 90 mins and dont forget your sensible walking shoes as you’ll be walking along cobbled streets and up high along the Chester Walls and Chester Rows as well as down to the Roman Amphitheatre and Roman gardens.

View from the walls

The Walls were originally started by the Romans and form an almost complete circuit of the city, measuring nearly 2 miles in length. There are four medieval gates to pass through aswell as some impressive towers and other National Heritage structures, one of them being one of the most prominent landmarks of the city, the Eastgate Clock.

Eastgate Clock

The Chester Rows also featured on the walking tour are half timber, covered galleries forming a second floor of shops above the 4 main streets below, some dating as far back at the 13th Century.  Whether taking a guided tour or not, it’s definitely worth finding one of the entrances and heading upwards as these are pretty unique, unlike no-where else and there is still a real sense of medieval history as you wander around the old and new shops up high.

After our walking tour was finished, we actually headed back to one of the Rows for an afternoon tea, at the recommended Mad Hatters which is housed in a 17th century rectory. I found it a little draughty, but the friendly staff, extensive range of teas and delicious cakes more than made up for it, I just had to wear my coat the entire time!

Feeling a bit sluggish after our sandwiches and cakes, we still had a good couple of hours left in the day, so we decided to head back outside and visit the Cathedral. It is located by the walls and opposite the Information Center and like most places in Chester easy to walk to. Founded as a Benedictine Abbey in 1092 and rebuilt in around 1250, there is so much to explore here, as well as the main cathedral building, there is a nature garden, falconery centre, cafe, obligatory gift shop, and dont forget to visit the LEGO project, as they are currently in the process of rebuilding an exact model of the cathedral in LEGO and if all goes to plan, it will make it into the Guinness Book of World Records. With so much more to explore in Cheshire, I’ll be back.

Chester Cathedral
 
River Dee
Cold day out
 

Chester Guided Tour – £7 

Cathedral, gardens and birds of prey centre £4 

Mad Hatters afternoon tea £16 pp

Other Chester sites – Chester Zoo, Chester Racecourse, River Dee cruise.